Pet stains on wood flooring - Noyeks Newmans Blog

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Pet stains on wood flooring

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dog peeing in house l1What do you do about "pet stains on our wood floors" questions arise regularly, in Noyeks, especially as we are such a great country for cats and dogs. The problems vary, older pets who have just got older, puppies and kittens who haven’t been trained yet, and of course babies crawling around your lovely floors.

What is urine? Between 90–95% of urine is water. It also contains a range of inorganic salts and organic compounds, including proteins and hormones. All mammals “pee”, and it is all similar in makeup.

Ok so let’s look at what this liquid does when it comes in regular contact with wood. Obviously it stains wood, making the affected area darker than the rest of your floor and it smells bad. It is a powerful liquid, used over the centuries for dying materials, bleaching etc.

YouTube is great for solutions to everyday problems and pet pee stains and odour removal solution videos are there aswell. Hydrogen Peroxide is the common solution. It works to a degree, bleaching the surface stain and depending on how thorough you are it will reach deeper into the wood with numerous applications but sometimes that’s not enough.

If the problem comes from years of “staining” and in a concentrated area, more work needs to be done. It may involve staining to blend in the areas in question, remember to consult with the manufacturer of the finish you are using to make sure they approve of your process. The problem though, can be deeper than what we see. The urine can soak into the floor through the gaps or cracks down to the tongues and grooves and beyond. Sometimes you may sand the floor, stain it to where it looks like new. Then you coat it and there is a chemical reaction with the organic compounds still soaked in the cracks and gaps.

If you want a nearly original wood floor, the best option is to remove the stained wood in question and insert new replacement wood. We always recommend that our customers either buy a little extra originally and/or store away the excess flooring from the installation to have for this eventuality. I have seen floors where the damage was way beyond the wood flooring itself and had affected the subfloor, and sometimes even the joists. Keep in mind that a "repair" is invisible and a "patch" is what amateurs do.

Good luck, and remember to hold your nose.

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